The finished gnome home

A New Gnome Home is Born

Each Gnome Home has its own personality and requires just the right old tree log to bring it to a new life. I searched a number of my sources and found the perfect log in an old stump pile at a nearby mill. The new gnome home-to-be is the top log in the pile.  Even on its side, you can see the whimsical potential.

A pile of logs, to become a gnome home

So with the help of a big tractor and my truck, the log came back to our log yard for construction.5' log to become a gnome home. Standing at that time over 5’ and weighing a lot, I then began to visualize the locations of the windows and doors. By looking at the photo, you can see there are many options.


The roof angle has been carved on this gnome home to be. Next was to select the front view and cut the roof     line. I only get one chance at getting it right on this cut. Good sharp saw blade and trust it comes out evenly. It did, and the personality started to come out.



From there, I cut it down to  4’ and began the carving of the An almost-completed gnome home. Needs a roof!windows and doors. I did use the many sticks and branches the customers provided. I also added my own, which we collect from our beach and coastal travels. This process can take days to a week. A little work, walk away, and come back again while changing and adding more features.

At some point, it is enough and the gnome home look is achieved. The final assembly is the addition of the roof, chimney and ridge top. This roof was made out of very old, large cedar shakes I found out in Joyce, WA, from a very old shack that was being removed.

Construction complete, small outdoor furniture was made and added. Window decorations and moss completed the project. It then became a true, woody, Whimsical Woods Gnome Home.

A great custom project that, with the “just right” log, turned out perfectly. Now the gnomes will find it and all will be blessed with happiness and good will. The finished gnome home

Val Jackson

Whimsical Woods

360-452-7308

www.whmsicalwoods.net

Gnome Home project in progress

Gnome Home Project – Progress Report #3

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I’m making progress on the log gnome home now that the rain has stopped. This is a very large tree stump that I am making into a permanent garden gnome home. This past weekend, I  added windows with little ledges. I also worked on the porch, filling in the area with dirt and moss, etc. to landscape the front. Maybe I’ll add a path or two.

Lastly, I will add on a roof, center beam, chimney, etc. to give it a whimsical look from a distance and will complete the landscaping with plants to bring out the natural setting. I’m trying to hide the modular home in the background, which will be a little challenging.

Thanks for watching the progress. Keep checking in. Thanks!IMG_8255

Val Jackson

Gnome Home Progress Report #2

Old Tree Stump Gnone Home Project – Progress Report

Gnome Home Progress Report #2

In the process, I carved out the windows and installed a gnome door and porch. Can’t over do it, but our woodland gnomes let me know what they like. These same little guys are the ones who help me in the garden by catching snails. See the blog story, http://whimsicalwoods.net/garden-slugssnails-vs-gnomes-2/

so best keep them happy. :-)

I’m working on incorporating the little stump in front into a porch entryway and may build a fireplace on it. Plan to add circular steps up to the porch from the ground. We’ll see how that turns out. It has been raining too much in the last few days to push ahead. Keep checking back for further updates.

All in fun here at Whimsical Woods.

http://whimsicalwoods.net

Gnomes at work

Winter Chores and Work

Gnomes at workThere is much to do during the dark winter nights. After a long sleep during the day, the gnomes must attend to their daily chores at night. Having very good and large eyes to help them see at night, there is no let up. Keeping the house fire going for warmth and cooking is top priority. One must haul in the dried wood and have enough for a whole day.

Once the chores are completed, the gnomes will head for the shop and special work area. Usually in a large old tree or under a very big boulder. It is in these shops the gnomes make all they need, from furniture, ceramics, tools, glass blowing and clothes making. Most winter nights are happily spent making these things. Sometimes other neighbors come to help if it is a big project. Some come just to visit and tell funny stories to pass the time. There is no “gnome mart” for them to shop so they must provide for themselves.

They are the true homesteaders I think. They work and oplay as a team. Everybody gets along with each other as one big family. Maybe we humans can learn something from our little gnome friends on how to get along better. I think in helping others, you are actually helping yourself a lot more. These are very smart little people we call gnomes.

All is well in Whimsical Woods


Snow – Snow – Oh No!

RGS_3962Now that winter is here and the snow begins to fall and pile up, our little gnome friends become little kids. They have fun playing in the snow. I heard once they make snowmen to look like us and have a good laugh. While out in the snow, they wear boots with special soles to look like animal prints. This is a very clever way of fooling those who want to catch or follow them. You can look around the ground under a bird feeder for their little show prints. The gnomes will walk in circles, or steps on moss and bare twigs in order to disguise their travels.

And yes, they play in the snow on old bark or dried leaves as a sled. They will roll up a snowball and roll it down a little slope to make a sled run. Just like us humans, they play in the snow.

Home is always warm and cozy with a glowing fireplace and a warm cup of apple cider. Maybe a cookie or two.

So, look for little prints in the snow. A bird, rabbit or even deer tracks in the fresh snow. If you smell a little smoke in the forest, chances are it came from a warm gnome home’s fireplace.

All is well in Whimsical Woods.


Gnome Harvest, Giving Thanks

GNOME “GIVING THANKS”

Gnome Harvest, Giving Thanks


In the Fall, as the nights grow colder and the trees begin to loose their leaves, the gnomes begin their Fall harvest. They must prepare for the long snowy winter ahead while they can with the help of their forest animal friends. Much can be accomplished when done by many helping hands. The harvest is now completed and it’s time to celebrate and give thanks to all their fellow gnomes and forest friends. The gnomes call it giving thanks, as we call it Thanksgiving.

The main “Giving Thanks” feast consists of many simple foods from the forest and nearby humans’ gardens. The main meal most likely is made up of lots of nuts and dried berries, fruit, beans, peas, carrots, beets, potatoes and anything else they can find at this time of year. Gnomes do not eat meat, but do like milk and cheese. Lots of protein there! Gnomes also love beer and fermented berry juice.

During the big feast, there is, of course, a lot of good story telling and many laughs. It is a happy time in our Whimsical Woods around Thanksgiving for all of us and our happy gnomes. A little extra bird seed scattered around is my way of saying thank you to all our little helpers.

Happy Thanksgiving

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Bigger is Better!

Here at Whimsical Woods, we can custom make Garden Gnome Homes that can be made as tall as 6 ft. These large Gnome Homes are for outdoor garden settings that can be viewed from a distance, thus larger features. The large custom creations are usually picked up by the customer, or we can work out a delivery solution. The best visual effect is a grouping of three at slightly different elevations. Add in some large boulders/rocks, small cedar trees, ferns, etc. and you’ve designed a very attractive unique garden feature. The addition of low wattage, 12 VDC outdoor waterproof lighting really makes it all pop out at night. Very whimsical!

I enjoy talking to those who are looking to add a little something different and have a little imagination to get a picture in their mind of what it might look like.

The bigger the Gnome Home, the further away you can see it to enjoy.

All in fun for all.

 http://whimsicalwoods.net

IMG_0364 IMG_1910 Giant Gnome Home almost as big as Val!

The Gnome Family

The Gnome Family Starts

The Gnome Family

After the honeymoon is over, the new couple settles into their new home in the groom’s village. It takes some time and a lot of visits to meet everyone, but over a period of weeks, the new bride is welcomed by friendship and a lot of sharing.

Before you “gnome” it, a set of twins is born with great celebration and joy. I have read that years ago, the families were very large, but now days they are a lot smaller in size for some reason.

Raising the twins is a shared effort by both parents. The mom’s responsibility is to teach their daughter the knowledge of the home – cooking, cleaning and making clothes, etc. The father teaches the son the skills they will need as they grow up like building, painting, sawmill operation, ceramics, glass blowing and gardening. Both parents teach their little ones the care needed to help their forest friends. Helping the sick, mending wounds, feeding the hungry and giving comfort.

For 100 years, they’ll live as a family growing and sharing the joys of the gnome life. There is very little stress, disagreement, or bitterness in the gnome community. Everyone helps each other expecting nothing in return, but we know what one gives, comes back to you in much greater ways. We humans could learn a lot from these little people.Maybe that is why, when we see a gnome figure, we usually have uncontrolled smiles.

All is well here at Whimsical Woods.

http://www.whimsicalwoods.net

Mr and Mrs Gnome

Mr. and Mrs. Gnome

Mr and Mrs Gnome


With the average age of 400 years for an adult gnome, the time for marriage is around 100 years old. The search for a girl may take the male gnome a long way from home. He travels via his favorite large goose that can easily carry him to other communities. I have read the boy gnome prefers plump womenfolk with nice round forms. Like us humans, the relationship starts with a careful introduction, small gifts and supervised time together. Just like us.(?) Next comes the introduction to the female’s parents and family, followed by her family’s visit back to his clan’s location to carefully inspect the home he has built with his male and female family and friends. The future father-in-law is the key inspector and judge. If all goes well, the wedding is planned.

At the stroke of midnight, under the bride’s birthday tree and in her mother’s family wedding dress, they are married. It is a small, but emotional wedding attended by close family and forest friends looking on from the woods.

A very festive dinner follows the wedding ceremony consisting of ripe nuts, fruit, greens, grains and of course beer and wine. Dancing is very important along with many stories and jokes. This all sounds like our weddings, doesn’t it?

The “young” 100-year old couple then heads out for a distant honeymoon trip, again using their favorite and  strongest animal friends for transportation and safe passage.

The beginning of a new life and many more stories to come. All is well here in our Whimsical Woods.

http://www.whimsicalwoods.net


Gnome swinging in the hops vines

“HOP” ON!

Gnome swinging in the hops vines

Hops are easy to grow here in the Pacific Northwest. They grow just like ivy to a height of 12’ or so and make a great arbor cover. Hops are a needed ingredient for making beer which the gnomes enjoy doing. They’re from Scandinavia, so beer making and drinking is in their genes.

A few hops buds go a long way.  We harvest ours and give to our son who is an excellent home brewer in So. Cal. We, of course, always leave a few for the gnomes. Nothing finer than a cold home-brewed beer on a hot day.

Hops are an perennial  plant. They die back to the ground and jump out in the spring. The smell of the mature hops is very sweet and autumn like. We bought ours in Eastern Washington where it is grown commercially. You need tall poles and rich watered soils to produce the hops but not something everyone has growing in their garden.

“Hop” on at Whimsical Woods. All is well.