A New Gnome Home is Born

Each Gnome Home has its own personality and requires just the right old tree log to bring it to a new life. I searched a number of my sources and found the perfect log in an old stump pile at a nearby mill. The new gnome home-to-be is the top log in the pile.  Even on its side, you can see the whimsical potential.

A pile of logs, to become a gnome home

So with the help of a big tractor and my truck, the log came back to our log yard for construction.5' log to become a gnome home. Standing at that time over 5’ and weighing a lot, I then began to visualize the locations of the windows and doors. By looking at the photo, you can see there are many options.


The roof angle has been carved on this gnome home to be. Next was to select the front view and cut the roof     line. I only get one chance at getting it right on this cut. Good sharp saw blade and trust it comes out evenly. It did, and the personality started to come out.



From there, I cut it down to  4’ and began the carving of the An almost-completed gnome home. Needs a roof!windows and doors. I did use the many sticks and branches the customers provided. I also added my own, which we collect from our beach and coastal travels. This process can take days to a week. A little work, walk away, and come back again while changing and adding more features.

At some point, it is enough and the gnome home look is achieved. The final assembly is the addition of the roof, chimney and ridge top. This roof was made out of very old, large cedar shakes I found out in Joyce, WA, from a very old shack that was being removed.

Construction complete, small outdoor furniture was made and added. Window decorations and moss completed the project. It then became a true, woody, Whimsical Woods Gnome Home.

A great custom project that, with the “just right” log, turned out perfectly. Now the gnomes will find it and all will be blessed with happiness and good will. The finished gnome home

Val Jackson

Whimsical Woods

360-452-7308

www.whmsicalwoods.net

Gnome Home Project – Progress Report #3

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I’m making progress on the log gnome home now that the rain has stopped. This is a very large tree stump that I am making into a permanent garden gnome home. This past weekend, I  added windows with little ledges. I also worked on the porch, filling in the area with dirt and moss, etc. to landscape the front. Maybe I’ll add a path or two.

Lastly, I will add on a roof, center beam, chimney, etc. to give it a whimsical look from a distance and will complete the landscaping with plants to bring out the natural setting. I’m trying to hide the modular home in the background, which will be a little challenging.

Thanks for watching the progress. Keep checking in. Thanks!IMG_8255

Val Jackson

Old Tree Stump Gnone Home Project – Progress Report

Gnome Home Progress Report #2

In the process, I carved out the windows and installed a gnome door and porch. Can’t over do it, but our woodland gnomes let me know what they like. These same little guys are the ones who help me in the garden by catching snails. See the blog story, http://whimsicalwoods.net/garden-slugssnails-vs-gnomes-2/

so best keep them happy. :-)

I’m working on incorporating the little stump in front into a porch entryway and may build a fireplace on it. Plan to add circular steps up to the porch from the ground. We’ll see how that turns out. It has been raining too much in the last few days to push ahead. Keep checking back for further updates.

All in fun here at Whimsical Woods.

http://whimsicalwoods.net

Winter Chores and Work

Gnomes at workThere is much to do during the dark winter nights. After a long sleep during the day, the gnomes must attend to their daily chores at night. Having very good and large eyes to help them see at night, there is no let up. Keeping the house fire going for warmth and cooking is top priority. One must haul in the dried wood and have enough for a whole day.

Once the chores are completed, the gnomes will head for the shop and special work area. Usually in a large old tree or under a very big boulder. It is in these shops the gnomes make all they need, from furniture, ceramics, tools, glass blowing and clothes making. Most winter nights are happily spent making these things. Sometimes other neighbors come to help if it is a big project. Some come just to visit and tell funny stories to pass the time. There is no “gnome mart” for them to shop so they must provide for themselves.

They are the true homesteaders I think. They work and oplay as a team. Everybody gets along with each other as one big family. Maybe we humans can learn something from our little gnome friends on how to get along better. I think in helping others, you are actually helping yourself a lot more. These are very smart little people we call gnomes.

All is well in Whimsical Woods


GNOME “GIVING THANKS”

Gnome Harvest, Giving Thanks


In the Fall, as the nights grow colder and the trees begin to loose their leaves, the gnomes begin their Fall harvest. They must prepare for the long snowy winter ahead while they can with the help of their forest animal friends. Much can be accomplished when done by many helping hands. The harvest is now completed and it’s time to celebrate and give thanks to all their fellow gnomes and forest friends. The gnomes call it giving thanks, as we call it Thanksgiving.

The main “Giving Thanks” feast consists of many simple foods from the forest and nearby humans’ gardens. The main meal most likely is made up of lots of nuts and dried berries, fruit, beans, peas, carrots, beets, potatoes and anything else they can find at this time of year. Gnomes do not eat meat, but do like milk and cheese. Lots of protein there! Gnomes also love beer and fermented berry juice.

During the big feast, there is, of course, a lot of good story telling and many laughs. It is a happy time in our Whimsical Woods around Thanksgiving for all of us and our happy gnomes. A little extra bird seed scattered around is my way of saying thank you to all our little helpers.

Happy Thanksgiving

Bigger is Better!

Here at Whimsical Woods, we can custom make Garden Gnome Homes that can be made as tall as 6 ft. These large Gnome Homes are for outdoor garden settings that can be viewed from a distance, thus larger features. The large custom creations are usually picked up by the customer, or we can work out a delivery solution. The best visual effect is a grouping of three at slightly different elevations. Add in some large boulders/rocks, small cedar trees, ferns, etc. and you’ve designed a very attractive unique garden feature. The addition of low wattage, 12 VDC outdoor waterproof lighting really makes it all pop out at night. Very whimsical!

I enjoy talking to those who are looking to add a little something different and have a little imagination to get a picture in their mind of what it might look like.

The bigger the Gnome Home, the further away you can see it to enjoy.

All in fun for all.

 http://whimsicalwoods.net

IMG_0364 IMG_1910 Giant Gnome Home almost as big as Val!

“HOP” ON!

Gnome swinging in the hops vines

Hops are easy to grow here in the Pacific Northwest. They grow just like ivy to a height of 12’ or so and make a great arbor cover. Hops are a needed ingredient for making beer which the gnomes enjoy doing. They’re from Scandinavia, so beer making and drinking is in their genes.

A few hops buds go a long way.  We harvest ours and give to our son who is an excellent home brewer in So. Cal. We, of course, always leave a few for the gnomes. Nothing finer than a cold home-brewed beer on a hot day.

Hops are an perennial  plant. They die back to the ground and jump out in the spring. The smell of the mature hops is very sweet and autumn like. We bought ours in Eastern Washington where it is grown commercially. You need tall poles and rich watered soils to produce the hops but not something everyone has growing in their garden.

“Hop” on at Whimsical Woods. All is well.


Gnoming When to Plant

Garden gnomes are reported to be excellent gardeners and caretakers. It is that time now, mid to late Spring, that we all look forward to getting the garden set with this summer’s fresh home-grown vegetables. Aside from forest mushrooms, the gnomes will look to help themselves to what the humans have planted. And they take great joy in catching those slugs.

Rabbits are their friends, so in they may come. Now the deer are also good friends with the gnomes and when they’re in the garden, they can eat way too much. So, the garden owner will probably overlook the slugs and work on the larger deer problem (tall fence and locked gate!)

After a long, cold winter, the gnomes are looking for fresh vegetables too. A fun gift from the gardener’s children is to lay out an extra carrot or two, maybe a few fresh greens and other Spring vegetables. Organic is best, but they’ll appreciate almost anything now. Make friends with your garden gnomes and they will return the gift and watch over your garden all summer.

Need a few little gnome garden homes around, just let us know. They’re on our website and we’d love to ship you one, or a few. They will be noticed and greatly appreciated.

All is well. Happy Easter to all.

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http://www.whimsicalwoods.net


Garden Slugs/Snails vs. Gnomes

Garden Slugs/Snails vs. Gnomes

Slugs and beer Growing up in New York suburb of Yonkers, my parents always planted a large vegetable garden each year. The slugs were plentiful and caused a lot of frustration and damage. Rather than use harmful poisons, my mother would fill a little tin or saucer with fresh beer. My grandfather was the founder and partner in the Yonkers Brewery on Chicken Island, famous for the Yonkers dark stout. The brewery was called Jackson Brewing. Anyway, we always had fresh beer to fill the tins to drown the slugs.

Well, I’ve since come to realize that the slugs were not in fact drowning, but the garden gnomes were drinking the beer on a nightly basis and whacking a few slugs to leave in the new empty tins. Humans thought the snails drowned, so out went more beer and back came more dead slugs and snails! the gnomes drank all the beer and gathered up the slugs. The end results were the same – less slugs/snails and a lot of happy gnomes!

So, when you go out in the morning and see a tin of slugs, but the beer is gone, the mystery of over. Where did the beer go? A few happy, sleeping gnomes with maybe a little headache, but looking forward to another night’s adventure in your garden. The garden gnomes whacked the slugs and drank the beer!
They are very small, but very clever. Happy garden gnomes are the key to a successful garden. All in fun and all is well in the Whimsical Woods.

SUET BIRD FEEDER MIXTURE

In the cold winter season, birds flock to the ever popular and nutritious suet feeders. Birds need protein and fat all winter long


Suet feeders with Val's homemade suetas their main food source, live bugs, are gone. Homemade mixtures are easy to make and are much healthier and cost less than the commercial suet cakes. Side-by-side tests prove that birds prefer the fresh suet/lard mix over the store-bought cakes.

Lard is easy to obtain and comes already rendered, like Crisco. You should be able to find it at your local market or specialty food store in tubs or 1 lb packages. We buy a 5 gal. bucket at a restaurant supply outlet.

To the lard, I add a generous amount of sugar and oatmeal (the quick-cooking kind which I pulverize in a food processor), which seems to stiffen up the mixture. It doesn’t need refrigeration, but should be kept cool. Add birdseed if you wish. The birds want the energy to to keep warm.

If you have a special recipe and/or photo, please share it with us. Have fun. Need a feeder? Drop us a line.




Suet feeder with homemade suet